About your Search

20130318
20130326
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6
's a holiday here on monday. that would give the government five more days to either get money out of russia or come up with some other way to solve the math here. remember when the end game is. this country asked for 17 billion euros from other european countries and they said we're not going to give you that much. we'll only give you 10 billion euros. we'll help you out with recapitalizing the banks but you guys have to come up with nearly 6 billion on your own and really the only place to get it is in deposits. we saw the parliament reject that last night. here's the one piece of insight that i can give you since being on the ground here. overseas everyone was aghast that would try to tax insured deposits. the vast majority of the cypriots we talk to are aghast at the concept of taxing any deposits even the wealthy. they see it as an attack on the business model of the country. and they don't want that to happen. where do you come up with the money is the question? guys, back to you. >> so many different angles as we go on. they'll take an american credit card. you're using credit cards a
the relationship between the members of this troika and whether this body can continue to govern these bailouts going forward. so it includes the imf led by christine legarde, ollie rehn and the relationship between the banks. the relationships looked extremely tense last night, but on their way out, they tried to assure us that there is actually no problem. here is what christine legarde had to say about it. >> would you tell us about the future of the troika with regards to future bailout? >> the troika is doing fine. actually, there are two of us. we're doing okay. thank you very much. >> so, you know, an attempt to look friendly, that was two out of the three representatives. we didn't see mario draghi, although he was present for these deliberations. so at a time when the eurozone has an economy that's extremely weak, where we've just learned that if anything the downturn is accelerating, that the austerity measures haven't succeeded in turning this country around and that there still is no uniform way here of dealing with the failure of these banks or frankly with sovereign bailouts going
a bill to avoid a government shutdown to fund agencies through september 30th. senators voted 63-35, in case you're wondering, to limit the debate o legislation. a final vote on the bill could come as early as today. it would be sent to the house for final approval this week. we're going to talk more about the financial issues facing the country with fix the debt. mark burtolini is the ceo and chairman of aetna. >> he said they've -- i think they've done some layoffs. the layoffs were set in place. >> will you combine the white house -- you know, those were shut down with the easter egg hunt. didn't you go on that one year? >> yeah. >> it's starting to dig. it's start to go cut. >> why are people so outraged? >> about the easter egg hunt? >> come on. >> this is one of those things you're not supposed to comment on, right? >> i love easter. >> you really do? >> but you don't have to have it paid for with taxpayer dollars. >> i love the eggs and hiding the eggs. >> it's secular. >> it's in that category. >> you know what it represents. >> it is. >> my birthday is number three, the
and that can be done in a couple of days, you reduce the government's financing demand requirement down to approximately 5 billion euros. because then all your financing are the government deficits. >> adam, thank you so much. >> my pleasure. >> becky, you highlight a really good point. what is very clear from this government and also from the people on the ground that i've spoken with is they absolutely don't want to see a reduction in the sides of the banking system here because they know that is what 50% of the economy and a ton of the jobs, as well. they realize it's going to be a change of livelihood. changes that will happen in this country no matter what are going to be startling to the people here. >> i saw all the headlines coming from russia and the president here making strong comments. is that going to fall on deaf ears in europe? is that not a big deal as far as they're concerned? >> that would be my interpretation, absolutely. would you agree with that, adam? whatever russia says is going to fall on deaf ears when it comes to the troika? >> it doesn't fall on deaf ears. bu
, but the key question for cypress now, given that this is a brand new government, they've only been in town for three weeks and they made an ex politicsit promise that they wouldn't hit depositors, that's going to be the key issue. can they pass it through parliament? carolin roth is the best person to speak to you about that. >> julia, thank you so much for that. everyone here in cyprus is anxiously waiting for that vote on a very controversial bailout deal. now, i should mention that at this point, the ruling party under the president does not have a clear majority in parliament to be able to push through that controversial vote because press reports are indicating that up to three parties could be voting against that bailout deal because of that deposit tax component. now, the president is currently meeting with the leaders of the political parties. of course, what he's trying to do is to strong arm and to persuade them into voting for that deal because the other alternative, yes, that is bankruptcy for this country, which has only 1 million people and only makes up 0.2% of the entire eu
and we are waiting for a statement now from the government in cyprus. events have been moving very, very quickly on the ground this morning. the finance minister had flown to moscow to wait it out for a negotiation on some form of the deal. but he's since flown back to cyprus this morning empty handed. all he managed to secure was the extension of an existing loan. the onus is now very much on the europeans and what they'll come up with. russian visitors were not interested into buying into the gas reserves. we are now waiting to see what they would come up with a plan to restructure the bank. but this discussion has been delayed and it feels as though this may have happened, some of the europeans, particularly the german webs they had been in this situation saying that they wanted to see out of any proposals, debt sustainability and also bank restructuring. this sustainability has been key because if the cypriots requested any form of a new loan, this would add to the debt burden that they had. the question has always been since the cypriots rejected that tax, how they plug this gap on
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)